The study of Latin is a wonderful way to teach advanced grammar skills—the first leg of the mediaeval trivium. No less importantly, it opens up the student to the living language of the Church and Her vast library of contributing authors. Students begin to learn Latin grammar; review and reinforce English grammar; memorize prayers; complete basic translations and compositions.

The study of Latin is a wonderful way to teach advanced grammar skills—the first leg of the mediaeval trivium. No less importantly, it opens up the student to the living language of the Church and Her vast library of contributing authors. Students cover the first 32 lessons of Benjamin D’Ooge’s Latin for Beginners; memorize 20 prayers; complete 20 translations and compositions.

Grammar includes the following:

Principles of Grammar; First and Second Declensions; Agreement of Adjectives; Possessive Adjective Pronouns; All Cases; The Nine Irregular Adjectives; The Demonstrative is, ea, id; Conjugation: Present, Imperfect, Future, Perfect, Pluperfect, and Future Perfect of sum, and 4 regular conjugations (active and passive); and more!

Translation assignments are available from all three time periods—ancient, medieval, and modern—which will allow students to pick works that complement their Traditio Nostra readings.


Continuing the pursuit of grammatical excellence and Catholic literacy, the students cover lessons 33 through 69 of Benjamin D’Ooge’s Latin for Beginners. And again cover twenty prayers, translations, and compositions.

Grammar includes the following: 

Passive Perfect, Pluperfect, and Future Perfect; Yes-or-no Questions; Accusative Subject of an Infinitive; The Relative and Interrogative Pronoun; Third-Fifth Declensions; Expressions of Place; Ablative of Time; Pronouns: Personal and Reflexive; The Intensive Pronoun Ipse; The Demonstrative Pronoun idem; The Demonstratives hic, iste, ille; The Indefinite Pronouns; Comparison of Adjectives; Deponent Verbs; The Subjunctive Mood; Inflection of the Present, Imperfect, Perfect, Future Perfect Subjunctive; The Subjunctive of Purpose, Result, and Characteristic; Substantive Clauses of Purpose; Verbs of Fearing; The Participles; Ablative Absolute; and more!

Translation assignments are available from all three time periods—ancient, medieval, and modern—which will allow students to pick works that complement their Traditio Nostra readings.


Many report that the completion of this three year cycle is often the equivalent to more than three years of study in the average high school program. By the second semester, students are doing topical readings on a range of subjects—in Latin! We cover lesson 70 through the end of Benjamin D’Ooge’s Latin for Beginners, finishing grammar by the end of the first semester.

Grammar includes the following:

Construction with cum; Ablative of Specification; Gerund and Gerundive; Predicate Genitive; Indirect Statements; Dative with Compounds; Subjunctive in Indirect Questions; Dative of Purpose or End for Which; Genitive and Ablative of Quality or Description; and more!

Students then transition away from memorization and into actual reading of long texts. Readings in the second semester include, but are not limited to: sacred music and art, vocations, education, work, and family life from such authors as Julius Caesar, Cicero, Ovid, and Augustine.


This is an advanced readings course in the Latin language that builds upon previous years of study. Students will continue to practice and develop reading techniques which will aid them in the comprehension of Latin texts. The readings include authors mainly from the classical period, such as Caesar and Virgil, with additional readings from Medieval and Modern Latin sources. The classical reading syllabus mirrors the Advanced Placement (AP) reading list. Medieval and Modern readings are taken from the great Latin poets and writers of the high middle ages and from Church encyclicals, both of which sources are important in forming the Catholic Latin student and his ability to go to the Latin when questions of translation arise. This course is immensely useful in preparing students for either the National Latin Exams or the AP Latin exam.

N.B. This course is not officially recognized by College Board,—the institution which crafts and sanctions AP exams—it only follows the curricular reading list to best prepare those who wish to take the exam.

Since students have already been introduced to the grammar of the Latin language, the focus of the class will be upon reading proficiency. Latin, like all other languages, uses syntactical patterns through which an author communicates the intended meaning. Teaching students to recognize these patterns is the goal of the course, and it greatly aids them in comprehending the language.


A wonderful complement to any Latin program, a gateway into countless works of great literature from one of the founding cultures of the West, and the means to read the New Testament in its original Greek, we are pleased to add this course in Classical Greek to our curriculum. The course uses the popular Athenaze book from Oxford Press and covers Book I.  The course begins with a fictional narrative about an Attic farmer's family placed in a precise historical context (423-431 B.C.). This narrative, interwoven with tales from mythology and the Persian Wars, gradually gives way in Book II to adapted passages from Thucydides, Plato, and Herodotus and ultimately to excerpts of the original Greek of Bacchylides, Thucydides, and Aristophanes' Acharnians. Essays on relevant aspects of ancient Greek culture and history are also woven throughout.